Liz Allen

Summarizing Scientific Knowledge about Agriculture and Climate Change in the Northwest U.S. and Plotting a Roadmap for the Future

Posted by Liz Allen | March 2, 2017

Back in March of 2016, a group of agriculture sector stakeholders– including researchers, policy makers and producers– met in Tri-Cities, Washington, for the Agriculture in a Changing Climate Workshop. The three-day workshop was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Northwest Climate Hub and National Institute of Food and Agriculture. Facilitators from the William D. Ruckelshaus Center were instrumental in supporting generative dialogue. Workshop participants worked together to define priorities for the future research and extension efforts focused on climate change mitigation and adaptation in the Northwest. Read more »

Filed under Climate Change
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BioEarth Webinar Series: Reporting on five years of climate impacts & nutrient dynamics research in the Northwest US

Posted by Liz Allen | November 30, 2016

WSU’s BioEarth research team is hosting a webinar series in collaboration with the Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources. The BioEarth project has sought to model biogeochemical cycles in a changing climate at the regional scale. Researchers will share their findings related to climate change impacts on Northwest US water resources, nutrient cycling, and managed and natural ecosystems. Webinars will focus on implications of research results for natural and agricultural resource management decisions. Details about the webinar series are available here. Read more »

Filed under Climate Change, News and Announcements
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Climate Impacts Modeling 101: Interpreting What Models Say About the Future of Our Region Under Climate Change

Posted by Liz Allen | August 4, 2015

modeling 101As a PhD student with CSANR interested in improving communication about climate and agriculture between the academic and decision-making spheres, I’ve had a lot of conversations about climate models with agricultural producers, industry representatives, policy makers and regulatory officials (as well as with modelers themselves!).  In the course of those conversations it has become clear that accessible explanations of how climate models are developed and how the results from climate change projections ought to be interpreted are lacking. Read more »

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Contact Liz Allen

Email: lizb.allen@wsu.edu