Georgine Yorgey

Precision nitrogen can benefit both farmers and the climate

Posted by Georgine Yorgey | October 21, 2014

In a previous post, I explained that available evidence currently indicates nitrous oxide emissions may be fairly low in the inland Pacific Northwest, compared to other cropland agricultural systems in the U.S. and world. If ongoing research confirms these early results, then I suggested that efforts to reduce nitrous oxide emissions need to focus on strategies that offered strong co-benefits. Read more »

Closing the Nutrient Loop

Posted by Georgine Yorgey | July 2, 2014

There are a number of sustainability issues getting a fair amount of attention these days: climate change, regional and local food systems, and soil health, to name a few. While this is obviously good, there are also issues that may be getting somewhat less attention than they deserve. And closing the nutrient loop is one of these. Read more »

Filed under Energy, Sustainable Practices and Technology
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Making Farming “Climate Friendly”: What is the impact of nitrous oxide in our region?

Posted by Georgine Yorgey | June 17, 2014

If you are interested in ensuring that farming is climate friendly you are likely to start thinking about nitrous oxide (N2O). Nitrous oxide is a powerful greenhouse gas (298 times as powerful as carbon dioxide, over a 100-year time frame). And nitrous oxide from agricultural soils is the single biggest contributor to agriculture’s direct greenhouse gas emissions, as estimated through inventories of greenhouse gas emissions. In Washington State, it was estimated that nitrous oxide from soils accounted for 46% of direct greenhouse gas emissions from agriculture in 2008.1 However, these estimates rely on “default” assumptions about nitrous oxide emissions that were developed from global data – and a review of existing experimental data in our region suggests these defaults may not be appropriate in our region. Read more »

Why Hasn’t Spring Gotten Warmer?

Posted by Georgine Yorgey | April 23, 2013

Agriculture is a seasonal endeavor.  And so the weather during each season can profoundly impact farmers and the crops they produce.  Now, researchers at University of Idaho and Oregon State University are providing some new insights on how the seasonal climate has changed over the last century in the PNW, and how it might change over the next 50 years. Read more »

Filed under Climate Change
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When it comes to extreme weather, can speed make science more relevant to management? Or more risky?

Posted by Georgine Yorgey | October 11, 2012

Over the last several months, the idyllic weather we’ve had in western Washington has contrasted sharply with reports of heat waves in the Northeast, drought in the Midwest, and wildfires in the Western U.S. (including eastern Washington).  As I listened to news reports, I often wondered whether changes in climate have contributed to these events.  It turns out I’m not the only one wondering. Climatologists have been working to answer that very question. Using newly developed methods, they have been providing more insight into the connections between increased greenhouse gas concentrations and the likelihood of extreme weather events. Read more »

Filed under Climate Change
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Contact Georgine Yorgey

Email: yorgey@wsu.edu