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Control of Xanthomonas in Cabbage Seed

Organic vegetable seed production continues to grow along with the demand for product, adding millions of dollars to Washington’s agricultural economy. Production of organic vegetable seeds is hindered by numerous pathogens. Because there is a lack of reliable organic control methods for bacterial black rot (caused by Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris) on crucifers, a biologically based solution would be readily adopted. Compost teas produce a large population of microorganisms in a short time with relatively accessible equipment — microbial communities that are potentially suited to competitively and/or directly inhibit pathogens and stimulate plant growth and defense responses. This work will establish methods of application and describe the microbial profile of compost tea that provides control of Xanthomonas bacterial black rot on cabbage seeds at time of planting and in production. The first step in this work has been to establish materials, conditions, and protocols that reliably produce similar microbial profiles, since compost teas are notoriously variable in make-up. Four specialized compost teas with very different microbial communities are being tested.

Grant Information

  • Project ID: 016
  • Project Status: Complete

2005

  • Principal Investigator(s): Carpenter-Boggs, L.
  • Investigator(s): Salter, C.
  • Student(s): Crosby, C.
  • Grant Amount: $21,000

2006

  • Principal Investigator(s): Carpenter-Boggs, L.
  • Investigator(s): Salter, C.
  • Student(s): Crosby, C.
  • Grant Amount: $25,730
  • 2006 Progress Report

2007

  • Principal Investigator(s): Carpenter-Boggs, L.
  • Grant Amount: $36,365