Trends in Organic Agriculture in the PNW

CSANR Project 003

Status: Complete

Project Summary

The project supported the collection, compilation, analysis, and outreach for statistics regarding the organic sector in Washington State. This required cooperation with the certifiers who collect the data from growers. The primary certifier in the state is the WSDA Organic Food Program, with an estimated 95% of the certified farms. Oregon Tilth also certifies a number of farms. These were the two primary data sources. In addition, data were gathered from several Washington tree fruit organizations that track sales volume and prices, and from the Research Institute for Organic Agriculture (FiBL) in Switzerland which now conducts an annual survey of global organic agriculture. Data from these sources were entered, reviewed, organized, and analyzed to describe the organic sector in various ways. On-line power point presentations were developed, and presentations were made at various grower meetings. Several documents were completed during 2012.

Annual Entries

2003

Principal Investigator: David Granatstein
Grant Amount: $9,745

2004

Principal Investigator: David Granatstein
Additional Investigators: Chris Feise
Elizabeth Kirby
Progress Report: http://organic.tfrec.wsu.edu/OrganicCropResearch/ProgressReports04/GranatsProgressReport04Stats.pdf
Grant Amount: $8,842

2005

Principal Investigator: David Granatstein
Additional Investigators: Chris Feise
Elizabeth Kirby
Progress Report: http://organic.tfrec.wsu.edu/OrganicCropResearch/ProgressReports05/GranatsPR05Stats.pdf
Grant Amount: $8,266

2006

Principal Investigator: David Granatstein
Additional Investigators: Chris Feise
Elizabeth Kirby
Progress Report: http://organic.tfrec.wsu.edu/OrganicCropResearch/ProgressReports06/GranatsPR06Stats.pdf
Grant Amount: $11,961

2007

Principal Investigator: David Granatstein
Progress Report: http://www.tfrec.wsu.edu/pdfs/P1812.pdf
Grant Amount: $9,179

2008

Principal Investigator: David Granatstein
Additional Investigator: Elizabeth Kirby
Progress Report: http://csanr.wsu.edu/wp-content/uploads/2003/06/ProgReport-Granatstein-Trends08.pdf
Grant Amount: $13,068

2009

Principal Investigator: David Granatstein
Additional Investigator: Elizabeth Kirby
Grant Amount: $11,853

2010

Principal Investigator: David Granatstein
Additional Investigator: Elizabeth Kirby
Progress Report: http://www.tfrec.wsu.edu/pdfs/P2773.pdf
Grant Amount: $15,910

Publications

Visit http://csanr.wsu.edu/trends-in-washington-agriculture/organic-statistics/ for many on line publications.

Kirby, E. and D. Granatstein. 2012. Status of organic tree fruit in Washington State. EM046E, Washington State University Extension. 32 pp. http://cru.cahe.wsu.edu/CEPublications/EM046E/EM046E.pdf

Kirby, E. and D. Granatstein. 2012. Trends in Washington State Organic Agriculture 2004–2011 Data. FS082E, Washington State University Extension. In production.

Certified organic acreage and sales in Washington State, 2005-2011 Tables. http://www.tfrec.wsu.edu/pdfs/P2439.pdf

Organic Tree Fruit Trends. http://www.tfrec.wsu.edu/pdfs/P2433.pdf

Current Status of Organic Agriculture in Washington State http://www.tfrec.wsu.edu/pdfs/P2452.pdf

Granatstein, D., H. Willer, and E. Kirby. 201x. Global expansion of organic fruit area. Acta Hort. accepted.

Kirby, E. and D. Granatsein. 2011. Tracking the Organic Sector: Regional and Crop Specific Statistics. USDA Organic Farming Systems Research Conference, Washington, DC. Mar. 16-18, 2011.

Granatstein, D.*, Kirby, E., Willer, H. 2010. Organic horticulture expands globally. Chronica Hort. December 2010. 50(4):31-38.

Granatstein, D.*, Kirby, E., Willer, H. 2010. Current world status of organic temperate fruits. Acta Hort. 873:19-36.

Kirby, E.M. and D. Granatstein. 2009. Trends in Washington State Organic Agriculture. WSU Extension Fact Sheet FS001E, Pullman, WA. 4 pp.

Granatstein, D. and E. Kirby. 2009. Current trends in organic tree fruit production. Proceedings 104th Annual Meeting, Wash. St. Hort. Assoc., Yakima, Dec. 1-3, 2008. WA. p. 155-157.

Kirby, E. and D. Granatstein. 2008. Organic tree fruit production continues to expand. Proceedings 103th Annual Meeting, Wash. St. Hort. Assoc., Wenatchee, WA, Dec. 3-5, 2007. WA. p. 166-171.

Granatstein, D.*, E Kirby, and H. Willer. 2009. The production base for organic temperate fruit, berries, and grapes. p. 108-111.IN: H. Willer and L. Kircher (eds.). The World of Organic Agriculture: Statistics and Emerging Trends 2009. FiBL/IFOAM, Frick, Switzerland.

Granatstein, D.* and E. Kirby. 2007. The changing face of organic tree fruit production. Acta Horticulturae 737:155-162.

Granatstein, D. 2007. Organic agriculture in Washington State. WSU Showcase, Seattle, WA, Sept. 6, 2007.

Granatstein, D. 2006. Recent trends in organic tree fruit production. Proceedings 101st Annual Meeting Wash. St. Hort. Assoc., Wenatchee, WA, Dec. 5-7, 2005. p. 149-150.

Granatstein, D.* 2004. Research directions for organic tree fruit production in North and South America. Acta Hort. (ISHS) 638:369-374. http://www.actahort.org/books/638/638_48.htm

Schotzko, R.T. and D. Granatstein. 2004. A brief look at the Washington apple industry: past and present. SES 04-05, Washington State University, Pullman, WA. 82 pp.

Granatstein, D. 2003. Organic tree fruit production, promise, and pitfalls. Compact Fruit Tree 36(3):85-85.

Impacts and Outcomes

Requests for the data come via email and phone every year from growers, businesses, consultants, agencies, media and NGOs. There have been multiple stories based on the statistics in trade magazines, in newspapers, and on radio. In a grower survey (n=62), 74% of the respondents said they use the organic tree fruit statistics we produce annually. The statistics helped 46% to make better business decisions, 18% to reduce risk, 8% to improve profitability. Just looking at organic apples in the state, there were 5.9 million boxes sold as organic in the 2009/2010 season. If 8% of this volume (per the 8% of people who said the statistics improved profits) experienced a $0.25/box improvement in price (a very modest change), that would equal $118,000 of financial impact in a year.