Winter Canola as a Rotation Crop in the Low and Intermediate Rainfall Regions of the Inland Pacific Northwest.

CSANR Project 018

Status: Complete

Annual Entries

2007

Principal Investigator: Bill Schillinger
Progress Report: http://www.tfrec.wsu.edu/pdfs/P1822.pdf
Grant Amount: $10,000

2008

Principal Investigator: Bill Schillinger
Progress Report: http://www.tfrec.wsu.edu/pdfs/P1819.pdf
Grant Amount: $10,000

2009

Principal Investigator: Bill Schillinger
Progress Report: http://www.tfrec.wsu.edu/pdfs/P1835.pdf
Grant Amount: $10,000

Publications

The research is ongoing. A journal article is planned upon completion of the research. Progress on the project has twice been reported in WSU Crop and Soil Sciences Field Day Reports. See two citations below:

Schillinger, W.F., T.A. Smith, S.E. Schofstoll, R. Jirava, and H. Johnson. 2009. Rotation benefits of winter canola on the subsequent wheat crop. In 2009 Field Day Abstracts: Highlights of Research Progress. Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences Tech. Report 09-1, WSU, Pullman, WA.

Schillinger, W.F., A.C. Kennedy, T.C. Paulitz, D.L. Young, and T.A. Smith. 2008. Winter canola as a rotation crop in the low and intermediate precipitation zones. In 2008 Field Day Abstracts: Highlights of Research Progress. Dept. of Crop and Soil Sciences Tech. Report 08-1, WSU, Pullman, WA.

Additional Funds Leveraged

Partial funding to support this project has been obtained from the WSU Biofuels Project in FY 2008, 2009, and 2010.

Impacts and Outcomes

To date we have found no benefits to wheat following winter canola. Winter canola uses more soil water than winter wheat, so the subsequent yield of wheat after winter canola tends to be significantly less than after winter wheat. The yield reduction is directly proportional to the amount of soil water (we have developed a model to predict wheat grain yield based on soil water and April, May, and June rainfall).