Alternative Crops & Cropping Systems Publications

24 Publications

Management to Reduce N2O Emissions in Organic Vegetable Production Systems

Cogger, C., A. Fortuna, D. Collins. Feb 27, 2014. The second of a two-part webinar series on Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Quality in Long-term Integrated and Transitional Reduced Tillage Organic Systems.

This is the focus of our current research. How do different organic vegetable production systems affect N2O emissions, and how do other outcomes of those systems affect their potential for adoption?

  • Systems include full tillage with high-carbon amendment (compost), full tillage with low carbon amendment (broiler litter), pasture-vegetable rotation, and reduced tillage cover crop mulch.
  • Measurements include N2O and CO2 emissions, soil N, microbial ecology focused on denitrification organisms, crop yield, and soil quality. Measurements are focused on key times during the season, including amendment application and tillage, irrigation, and freeze-thaw.

Intended audience is other researchers, and interested extension faculty and farmers.

Why the Concern about Nitrous Oxide Emissions?

Cogger, C., A. Fortuna, D. Collins. Feb 25, 2014. The first of a two-part webinar series on Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Quality in Long-term Integrated and Transitional Reduced Tillage Organic Systems.

Topics for this webinar include:

  • Source and properties of N2O as a greenhouse gas, its relative contribution to global
  • warming, and the role of agriculture in N2O emissions
  • Review of the nitrogen cycle and the production of N2O
  • The relationship between organic practices and N2O production
  • How we measure N2O emissions

Intended audience is extension faculty and farmers who want a big picture perspective on why we’re interested in nitrous oxide emissions.

Life cycle assessment of the potential carbon credit from no- and reduced-tillage winter wheat-based cropping systems in Eastern Washington State

Zaher, U, C. Stockle, K. Painter, S. Higgins. Agricultural Systems. November 2013. Volume 122, pages 73-78.

Organic Farming Footprints

WSU webpage for the OFoot project, working to provide a scientifically sound yet simple estimation of the carbon and nitrogen sequestration and net greenhouse gas (GHG) balance likely in a given organic cropping system scenario.

Dryland Organic Agriculture in the PNW: Meeting Opportunities and Challenges

At the Tilth Producers of Washington Conference in November 2011, WSU hosted a Dryland Organic Agriculture Symposium. The presentations and keynote from that symposium were recorded and are now available for online viewing. This special symposium addressed agronomic and economic issues specific to dryland organic production.  Speakers and attendees came from Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and Montana. Also, please see link for a list of companies interested in buying organic crops produced in the PNW: Dryland Organic Agriculture in the PNW – grains sellers buyers

WSU Vegetable Research and Extension

Vegetable crop production and alternative crop development such as edamame, wasabi, bamboo, and organic seed production. Work is targeted for both small-scale and large commercial growers, with emphasis on organic production. Links include new fact sheets and information on grafted vegetables http://vegetables.wsu.edu/graftingVegetables.html .

Conventionalization, civic engagement, and the sustainability of organic agriculture

Goldberger, J. 2011. Journal of Rural Studies 27(3):288-296.

High Residue Farming under Irrigation

Andy McGuire, Agricultural Systems Educator WSU Extension. Program website.

Organic Vineyard Establishment: Trellis and Planting Stock Considerations – June 2010

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Precision Conservation: site-specific trade-offs of harvesting wheat residues for biofuel feedstocks

Huggins, D.R., & Kruger, C.E. (2010). In R. Khosia (Ed.), Proceedings of the 10th International Conference on Precision Agriculture. 10th International Conference on Precision Agriculture, Denver, CO. Colorado State University.

Yield, Protein and Nitrogen Use Efficiency of Spring Wheat: Evaluating Field-Scale Performance

Chapter 17 in Climate Friendly Farming: Improving the Carbon Footprint of Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. Full report available at http://csanr.wsu.edu/pages/Climate_Friendly_Farming_Final_Report/.

Site-Specific N Management for Direct-Seed Cropping Systems

Chapter 16 in Climate Friendly Farming: Improving the Carbon Footprint of Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. Full report available at http://csanr.wsu.edu/pages/Climate_Friendly_Farming_Final_Report/.

Field Heterogeneity of Soil Organic Carbon and Relationships to Soil Properties and Terrain Attributes

Chapter 14 in Climate Friendly Farming: Improving the Carbon Footprint of Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. Full report available at http://csanr.wsu.edu/pages/Climate_Friendly_Farming_Final_Report/.

An Economic Analysis of the Potential for Carbon Credits to Improve Profitability of Conservation Tillage Systems Across Washington State

Chapter 24 in Climate Friendly Farming: Improving the Carbon Footprint of Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. Full report available at http://csanr.wsu.edu/pages/Climate_Friendly_Farming_Final_Report/.

Economic Enterprise Budgets for Conservation Tillage Systems in Washington State.

Appendix A: Lind Conventional and Reduced Tillage

Appendix B: St. John Conventional Tillage

Appendix C: St. John No Tillage

Appendix D: Pullman Conventional Tillage

Appendix E: Pullman Reduced Tillage

Appendix F: Pullman No Tillage

Appendix G: Irrigated Conventional Tillage

Appendix H: Irrigated Reduced Tillage

Potential for a Sugar Beet Ethanol Industry in Washington State

A Report to the Washington State Department of Agriculture. School of Economic Sciences. WSU. March 2009

Organic Alfalfa Management Guide

This new extension bulletin is an excellent resource for growers interested in producing organic alfalfa, both irrigated and dryland. Alfalfa provides an excellent transitional crop for those interested in organic production of other crops as well. This guide includes a great deal of information on managing weeds, pests and diseases, and includes a small section on economics.

Growing Grains and Dry Beans in Whatcom County: Expanding the Potential for Local Foods Production in Northwest Washington – March 2009

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Crop Yield and Revenue Variability Across Time and Space at the Cook Agronomy Farm, 2001-2006

D. Huggins and K. Painter. Abstract in 2008 Dryland Field Day Abstracts: Highlights of Research Progress.

Davenport Living Snowfence Demonstration – Fall 2008

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Improving Nitrogen Use Efficiency in Dryland Cereal Crops With Precision Nitrogen Management Technology – Fall 2008

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Research Brief: Market and Opportunities for Organic Feed Production in Eastern Washington – April 2007

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Alternatives to Plastic Mulch for Organic Vegetable Production – June 2005

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Ecological and Organic Farm Management Workshop Proceedings

Proceedings from Wilsonville, Oregon workshop February 2004.

The Precision Irrigation Development and Demonstration Project – December 2003

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter