Insect Management Publications

22 Publications

Impacts of genetically engineered crops on pesticide use in the U.S. — the first sixteen years

Benbrook, Charles. Oct 1 2012  Environmental Sciences Europe 2012, 24:24 doi:10.1186/2190-4715-24-24.

WSU Integrated Pest Management

WSU Entomology IPM website. Links to information on statewide IPM activities in Washington including crops, turf, garden, school grounds, and riparian buffers.

Spotted Wing Drosophila – Monitoring with Traps – June 2010

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

The Potential of Marigolds to Control Insect Pests and Plant Parasitic Nematodes – August 2009

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Material Registration for Organic Production – Winter 2008

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

An Organic Pesticide is Still a Pesticide – April 2007

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

The Effects of Reducing Tillage on Pest Management

Andy McGuire, WSU Extension. 2007. An increasing number of farmers in the Columbia Basin are adapting reduced tillage systems from other regions to our conditions and crops. This paper will examine the general effects of reducing tillage on the management of weeds, insects, and diseases. Because these systems have been developed mainly in the Midwest and Canada, much of the information presented here is for the conditions and crops (mainly corn and wheat) in those regions. Experience will show what holds true under our conditions.

Chemigation and Fertigation in Washington State – December 2006

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

New wireworm Pests in Western Washington – June 2006

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Organic Control of Cherry Fruit Fly

The active ingredient spinosad, a microbial insecticide, was tested for efficacy against cherry fruit fly. Several formulations were tested. The GF-120 product, a combination of spinosyn and a feeding attractant, proved very effective. A new system of control using point sources versus complete canopy cover was developed. The use of GF-120, an organically approved material, for cherry fruit fly control has become widespread among cherry producers in the region, both conventional and organic. It is very effective, non-toxic to humans, low impact to beneficials, and low cost due to the low volume used and quick application.

Plants Chatter to Defend Themselves Against Pests and HIPPOs Can Improve the Conversation – March 2005

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Making the Bugs Work for You: Biological Control in Organic Agriculture – December 2004

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Peshastin Creek Areawide Organic Project

The Peshastin Creek Project was created as a joint effort between the Peshastin Creek Growers Association and the Pear Entomology Lab of the WSU Tree Fruit Research and Extension Center in Wenatchee. The research lab provides a monitoring service for the growers in the valley, to support their efforts toward increased use of environmentally-friendly pest management. Bluebird Fruit has created a special “Gently Grown” label for the fruit produced by the PCG Association. The project compares insect pest management under conventional, ‘soft’, and organic management regimes.

Rose Gardens Make Fruit Orchards More Inviting to Friendly Wasps

Apple, pear, and cherry growers in parts of Washington and Oregon are planting wild rose gardens next to their orchards as part of an areawide study conducted by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) and Washington State University (WSU) scientists to bolster spring populations of tiny, parasitic wasps that attack several leafroller moths in tree fruits.

Getting the Bugs to Work for You: Biological Control in Organic Agriculture

Symposium proceedings from Portland, Oregon November 2004.

Research Program on Nematodes & Their Economic Importance in Washington State – December 2003

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Identifying and Harnessing HIPPOs for Hop and Grape Pest Management

Dr. David James, Department of Entomology, WSU Prosser. Biological control and integrated pest management in irrigated horticultural cropping systems. Using and understanding natural enemies to provide biocontrol and reduce pesticide use in hops and grapes. HIPPO stands for Herbivore-Induced Plant Protection Odor.

Controlling Codling Moth in Organic Pear Orchards

WSU Entomology. 2003.

Tracking and Managing the Cherry Bark Tortrix – June 2003

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Bat Houses for IPM: Benefits for Bats and Organic Farmers – March 2003

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Final Report: Alternative Pest Management Strategies for Integrated Pest Management

Feise, C. 2002. Washington State University. EPA GRANT NO. E980300013.

Mating Disruption

Using phermones for management of codling moth in orchards.