Collins Publications

32 Publications

Management to Reduce N2O Emissions in Organic Vegetable Production Systems

Cogger, C., A. Fortuna, D. Collins. Feb 27, 2014. The second of a two-part webinar series on Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Quality in Long-term Integrated and Transitional Reduced Tillage Organic Systems.

This is the focus of our current research. How do different organic vegetable production systems affect N2O emissions, and how do other outcomes of those systems affect their potential for adoption?

  • Systems include full tillage with high-carbon amendment (compost), full tillage with low carbon amendment (broiler litter), pasture-vegetable rotation, and reduced tillage cover crop mulch.
  • Measurements include N2O and CO2 emissions, soil N, microbial ecology focused on denitrification organisms, crop yield, and soil quality. Measurements are focused on key times during the season, including amendment application and tillage, irrigation, and freeze-thaw.

Intended audience is other researchers, and interested extension faculty and farmers.

Why the Concern about Nitrous Oxide Emissions?

Cogger, C., A. Fortuna, D. Collins. Feb 25, 2014. The first of a two-part webinar series on Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Quality in Long-term Integrated and Transitional Reduced Tillage Organic Systems.

Topics for this webinar include:

  • Source and properties of N2O as a greenhouse gas, its relative contribution to global
  • warming, and the role of agriculture in N2O emissions
  • Review of the nitrogen cycle and the production of N2O
  • The relationship between organic practices and N2O production
  • How we measure N2O emissions

Intended audience is extension faculty and farmers who want a big picture perspective on why we’re interested in nitrous oxide emissions.

Anaerobic Digestion Systems: Integrating emerging technologies to improve environmental and economic impact

C. Frear, C.Kruger, H. Collins, M. Garcia-Perez, C. Stockle, R. Shumway, G. Astill, T. Ewing, N. Kennedy, T. Khalil, and G. Yorgey. July 2013. Academic Poster.

Soil Fertility in Organic Systems: A Guide for Gardeners and Small Acreage Farmers

Collins,D. C. Miles, C. Cogger, R. Koenig. 2013.  Pacific Northwest Extension Publication PNW646.

Carbon storage and nitrous oxide emissions of cropping systems in eastern Washington: A simulation study

Stöckle, C., S. Higgins, A. Kemanian, R. Nelson, D. Huggins, J. Marcos, and H. Collins. Journal of Soil and Water Conservation 2012 67(5):365-377; doi:10.2489/jswc.67.5.365.

Soil Testing: A Guide for Farms with Diverse Vegetable Crops

Collins, D. 2012. Washington State University Extension. EM050E.

Reduced Tillage on Organic Farms Virtual Field Day

WSU researchers and extension educators are researching different methods for reducing tillage in organic vegetable production. This video demonstrates termination of barley and vetch cover crops with a roller/crimper and flail mower.

Northwest Soil Science: Nitrogen Mineralization

Soil Scientist Doug Collins published an article on Readthedirt.org that explains his research on how and when soil nutrients are available to crops.

Biochar Produced from Anaerobically Digested Fiber Reduces Phosphorus in Dairy Lagoons

Streubel, J. D., H. P. Collins, J. M. Tarara, and R. L. Cochran.; Posted online 5 Jan. 2012

Carbon sequestration under irrigated switchgrass (Panicum virgatum) production

Collins, H.P., Smith, J.L., Fransen, S.C., Alva, A., Kruger, C.E., & Granatstein, D.M. (2010). Soil Science Society of America Journal. 74(6), 2049-2058.

CropSyst Simulation of the Effect of Tillage and Rotation on the Potential for Carbon Sequestration and on Nitrous Oxide Emissions in Eastern Washington

Chapter 23 in Climate Friendly Farming: Improving the Carbon Footprint of Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. Full report available at http://csanr.wsu.edu/pages/Climate_Friendly_Farming_Final_Report/.

Bioenergy as an Agricultural GHG Mitigation Strategy in Washington State

Chapter 22 in Climate Friendly Farming: Improving the Carbon Footprint of Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. Full report available at http://csanr.wsu.edu/pages/Climate_Friendly_Farming_Final_Report/.

Greenhouse Gas Fluxes from Irrigated Sweet Corn (Zea mays L.) and Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.)

Chapter 21 in Climate Friendly Farming: Improving the Carbon Footprint of Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. Full report available at http://csanr.wsu.edu/pages/Climate_Friendly_Farming_Final_Report/.

Reduced Tillage in an Irrigated Potato Rotation

Chapter 20 in Climate Friendly Farming: Improving the Carbon Footprint of Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. Full report available at http://csanr.wsu.edu/pages/Climate_Friendly_Farming_Final_Report/.

Monitoring Soil Carbon Pools and Fluxes Following Land Conversion to Irrigated Agriculture in a Semi-arid Shrub Steppe Ecosystem

Chapter 19 in Climate Friendly Farming: Improving the Carbon Footprint of Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. Full report available at http://csanr.wsu.edu/pages/Climate_Friendly_Farming_Final_Report/.

Monitoring Carbon Sequestration and Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Irrigated AgroEcosystems

Chapter 18 in Climate Friendly Farming: Improving the Carbon Footprint of Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. Full report available at http://csanr.wsu.edu/pages/Climate_Friendly_Farming_Final_Report/.

Climate Friendly Farming Final Report: Improving the Carbon Footprint of Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest

The WSU Center for Sustaining Agriculture & Natural Resources established the Climate Friendly Farming Project in 2003 with an initial grant from the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation. This report represents the culmination of research and assessment of the potential for improved management and technology deployment to reduce agricultural greenhouse gas emissions in the Pacific Northwest.

Application of AD Dairy Manure Effluent to Fields and Associated Impacts

Chapter 10 in Climate Friendly Farming: Improving the Carbon Footprint of Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. Full report available at http://csanr.wsu.edu/pages/Climate_Friendly_Farming_Final_Report/.

Organic Waste to Resources Research and Pilot Project Report: Use of Biochar from the Pyrolysis of Waste Organic Material as a Soil Amendment

David Granatstein, Chad Kruger, Hal Collins, Manuel Garcia-Perez, and Jonathan Yoder, September 2009. Biochars from different feedstocks were tested on five soils. Biochars on all soil types increased soil C. Biochar C was stable in soil with mean residence times estimated in the hundreds of years. Soil nitrate levels were reduced with increasing biochar rate perhaps due to ammonium adsorption. Biochar did not accelerate loss of indigenous organic matter through the ‘priming effect.′ Biochars raised soil pH, but did not lead to consistent plant growth improvements.

Utilization of Re-Processed Anaerobically Digested Fiber from Dairy Manure as a Container Media Substrate

MacConnell, C.B. and Collins, H.P. 2009. Acta Horticulturae (ISHS) 819:279-286

Monitoring Greenhouse Gas Fluxes from an Irrigated AgroEcosystem – Fall 2008

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Greenhouse Gas Fluxes from an Irrigated Sweet Corn (Zea mays L.) – Potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) Rotation

Haile-Mariam, S., H.P. Collins, and S.S. Higgins. 2008. Journal of Environmental Quality. 37:759-771.

Fractionation and long-term laboratory incubation to measure soil organic matter dynamics

Haile-Mariam, S., H.P. Collins, S.E. Wright, and E.A. Paul. 2008. Soil Science Society of America Journal. 72:370-378.

Effect of Mustard Seed Meal on Early Weed Emergence in Peppermint and Potato – Summer 2007

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Switchgrass Production in Washington: Biofuel Feedstocks in Washington Part II – April 2007

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

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