Garcia-Perez Publications

13 Publications

Dairy Waste Biorefinery

Kennedy, N., C. Frear, M. Garcia-Perez, C. Kruger, and S. Chen. 2013. Concept illustration and description.

Organic Waste Biorefinery

Kennedy, N., C. Frear, M. Garcia-Perez, C. Kruger, and S. Chen. 2013. Concept illustration and description.

Anaerobic Digestion Systems: Integrating emerging technologies to improve environmental and economic impact

C. Frear, C.Kruger, H. Collins, M. Garcia-Perez, C. Stockle, R. Shumway, G. Astill, T. Ewing, N. Kennedy, T. Khalil, and G. Yorgey. July 2013. Academic Poster.

2011-2013 Anaerobic Digestion Related R&D Research Summary for WSU ARC/WSDA Appendix-A Funds

Frear, C, M. Garcia-Perez, C. Kruger, S. Chen. 2013.

Methods for Producing Biochar and Advanced Biofuels in Washington State Part 3: Literature Review Technologies for Product Collection and Refining

Garcia-Perez, M. et. al. 2012. This is the third of a series of reports exploring the use of biomass pyrolysis to sequester carbon and to produce fuels and chemicals.

Methods for Producing Biochar and Advanced Biofuels in Washington State Part 2: Literature Review of the Biomass Supply Chain and Preprocessing Technologies From Field to Pyrolysis Reactor

Garcia-Perez, M., C. Kruger, M. Fuchs, S. Sokhansanj, P. Badger, J. Garcia-Nunez, T. Lewis, and S. Kantor. 2012. Second Project Report. Department of Biological Systems Engineering and the Center for Sustaining Agriculture and Natural Resources, Washington State University, Pullman, WA, 79 pp.

Methods for Producing Biochar and Advanced Biofuels in Washington State Part 1: Literature Review of Pyrolysis Reactors

Garcia-Perez, M., T. Lewis, C. Kruger. 2011. Funding for this study is provided by the Washington State Department of Ecology with the intention to address the growing demand for information on the design of advanced pyrolysis units. This is the first of a series of reports exploring the use of biomass thermochemical conversion technologies to sequester carbon and to produce fuels and chemicals.

Overview of Biomass Pyrolysis Technologies – Historical developments and potential for the production of bio-char, advances fuels and high value chemicals

Recorded webinar (online presentation) from June 1st, 2011 by Manuel Garcia-Perez, PhD; Assistant Professor, Biological Systems Engineering. The reactors used for biomass pyrolysis can be classified into slow and fast pyrolysis. While slow pyrolysis reactors are mainly used to produce charcoal, fast pyrolysis is the technology of choice to maximize bio-oil yields. Yields as high as 80 wt can be obtained with this technology. During the webinar historical developments and potential of pyrolysis technologies for the production of bio-char, advanced fuels and high value chemicals are discussed.

Economic tradeoff between biochar and bio-oil production via pyrolysis

Yoder, J., S. Galinato, D. Granatstein and M. Garcia-Perez. 2011. Biomass and Bioenergy, 35(5):1851-1862.

WSU Thermo-Chemical Engineering Laboratory: Manuel Garcia-Perez

Professor Garcia-Perez is an expert in thermo-chemical engineering of biomass into energy and products. Our work with Garcia-Perez includes the development and evaluation of biochar from the pyrolysis of woody organic wastes as a potential soil amendment.

Organic Waste to Resources Research and Pilot Project Report: Use of Biochar from the Pyrolysis of Waste Organic Material as a Soil Amendment

David Granatstein, Chad Kruger, Hal Collins, Manuel Garcia-Perez, and Jonathan Yoder, September 2009. Biochars from different feedstocks were tested on five soils. Biochars on all soil types increased soil C. Biochar C was stable in soil with mean residence times estimated in the hundreds of years. Soil nitrate levels were reduced with increasing biochar rate perhaps due to ammonium adsorption. Biochar did not accelerate loss of indigenous organic matter through the ‘priming effect.′ Biochars raised soil pH, but did not lead to consistent plant growth improvements.

Organic Waste to Resources Research and Pilot Project Report: New Biorefinery Concept to Convert Softwood Bark to Transportation Fuels Final Report to the Washington State Department of Ecology

Manuel Garcia-Perez, Shulin Chen, Shuai Zhou,Zhouhong Wang, Jieni Lian, Robert Lee Johnson, Shi-Shen Liaw and Oisik Das, September 2009. This project tested a new pretreatment concept to enhance the production of sugars from the fast pyrolysis of wood and straw. It proved that sugars recovered from pyrolysis can be easily converted into ethanol. These two results are important because they show that fast pyrolysis of wood or straw followed by bio-oil hydro-treatment can create green gasoline and diesel (from lignin), as well as ethanol (from cellulose).

The Formation of Polyaromatic Hydrocarbons and Dioxins During Pyrolysis: A Review of the Literature with Descriptions of Biomass Composition, Fast Pyrolysis Technologies and Thermochemical Reactions

Manuel Garcia-Perez, June 2008. It is clear that any new thermochemical processing technologies must represent clean processes. To examine whether the production of bio-oils and biochar could generate PAH and dioxins during pyrolysis processes, a global literature review was conducted. Processing method for recovering energy, fuel and products from organic waste can have detrimental impacts such as odors and emissions from compost yards. This report also contains laboratory data on PAH and dioxins within biochar and bio-oil produced at the laboratory.