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Science in action to improve the sustainability of agriculture, natural resources, and food systems
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Pathogen & Nematode Management

Pathogens, those infectious organisms that reduce crop yield and/or quality, must be managed to reduce the damage they cause to levels that do not affect farmers’ profitability, but with an eye to maintaining environmental and human health. Alternatives to pesticides, better use of pesticides, and use of better pesticides (less toxic, targeted specifically to pest, lower effective rates, etc.) are all options to increase sustainability.
 

Featured Publications

Biofumigant Cover Cropping in Potatoes: Dale Gies (Farmer to Farmer Case Study Series)

Yorgey, G.G., S.I. Kantor, C.E. Kruger, K.M. Painter, H. Davis, and L.A. Bernacchi. 2017. Pacific Northwest Extension Publication 693, Pullman, WA.

Disease Management for Wheat and Barley

Kirby, E., T. Paulitz, T. Murray, K. Schroeder, X. Chen. 2017. Chapter 10 In Yorgey, G. and C. Kruger, eds. Advances in Dryland Production Systems in the Pacific Northwest. Washington State University Extension, Pullman, WA.

Pythium species associated with damping-off of pea in certified organic fields in the Columbia Basin of central Washington

Alcala, A.C., Paulitz, T.C., Schroeder, K.L., Porter, L.D., Derie, M.L., and du Toit, L.J. 2016. Plant Disease 100:916-925.

High Residue Farming Under Irrigation: Pest Management Considerations (series 4 of 4)

This publication is the fourth in a series on high residue farming (HRF), for farmers who are interested in HRF. This publication gives an overview of the effects of adopting HRF on the management of weeds, insects, and diseases. EM074E.

Mustard Green Manures

On-farm research has been conducted since 1999 to determine the benefits of mustard green manures and to improve their effectiveness. They are being used in irrigated regions of Eastern Washington to improve soil quality, control wind erosion, and manage soilborne pests.

Apple Replant Disease – Alternatives to Fumigation

Dr. Mark Mazzola, USDA-ARS Tree Fruit Research Lab, Wenatchee, WA. Website highlighting several publications on Apple Replant Disease.

Additional Publications

WSU Integrated Pest Management

WSU Entomology IPM website. Links to information on statewide IPM activities in Washington including crops, turf, garden, school grounds, and riparian buffers.

Advances in Brassica seed meal formulation and application protocol for control of apple replant disease.

M. Mazzola poster, December 2010, Wash. St. Hort. Assoc. meeting. A summary of the most recent field results using brassica seed meal mixtures.

Silver Scurf Caused by Helminthosporium solani Can Be A Polycyclic Disease on Below Ground Potato Tubers – April 2010

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Management of Damping-off in Organic Vegetable Crops in the Pacific Northwest – December 2009

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Implementing Mustard Green Manure Crops on the Fort Hall Indian Reservation – August 2009

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Characterization of compost tea microbial communities, and their effects on seed borne Xanthomonas campestris pv campestris

Crosby, C. 2008. M.S. Thesis. Hard copy available through WSU library system.

Soil Amendment with Limestone for Management of Fusarium Wilt in Spinach Seed Crops in the Pacific Northwest – Winter 2008

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Material Registration for Organic Production – Winter 2008

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

2008 Partial Budget Analysis for the Replacement of Metam Sodium by a Mustard Green Manure

Partial budget for fumigant replacement.

Brassica juncea seed meal as a fumigant in organic greenhouse production

Poster presentation – BIOAg Research Symposium 2008.

Compost teas as potential biocontrol agents for control of Xanthomonas campestris

Poster presentation – BIOAg Research Symposium 2008.


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