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Weed Management

Weeds are defined as “plants out of place.” In agriculture, these are often pioneer species that are adapted to the disturbed conditions in a farm field, and many are exotic species without the natural biocontrols that may exist in their native habitat. CSANR has focused on weed control approaches that are more biologically based (e.g., grazing, crop rotation) and/or that are allowable for use on organic farms (e.g., tillage, mulching). Weed problems and weed control strategies vary greatly along with our varied climate and crops in the state.

 

Featured Publications

Integrated Weed Management

Burke, I., K. Kahl, N. Tautges, F. L. Young. 2017. Chapter 9 In Yorgey, G. and C. Kruger, eds. Advances in Dryland Production Systems in the Pacific Northwest. Washington State University Extension, Pullman, WA.

High Residue Farming Under Irrigation: Pest Management Considerations (series 4 of 4)

This publication is the fourth in a series on high residue farming (HRF), for farmers who are interested in HRF. This publication gives an overview of the effects of adopting HRF on the management of weeds, insects, and diseases. EM074E.

Productivity, economics, and fruit and soil quality of weed management systems in commercial organic orchards in Washington State, USA

Granatstein, D., P. Andrews, and A. Groff. May 2014. Organic Agriculture. DOI 10.1007/s13165-014-0068-0

Using Biodegradable Plastics as Agricultural Mulches

Corbin, A., Cowan, J., Miles, C.A., Hayes, D., Dorgan, J., Inglis, D.A., January 2013. WSU Extension Fact Sheet FS103E.

Impacts of genetically engineered crops on pesticide use in the U.S. — the first sixteen years

Benbrook, Charles. Oct 1 2012  Environmental Sciences Europe 2012, 24:24 doi:10.1186/2190-4715-24-24.

Those Nasty Weeds – Why Not Control Naturally with Livestock

Managed grazing update provided by Extension Educator Steve Van Vleet. Sept 2011.

 

Additional Publications

Plastic & Biodegradable Mulch

WSU Mount Vernon website including presentations, publications and research reports from Dr. Carol Miles on plastic and biodegradable mulch for weed management.

WSU Integrated Pest Management

WSU Entomology IPM website. Links to information on statewide IPM activities in Washington including crops, turf, garden, school grounds, and riparian buffers.

Controlling Leafy Spurge by Goat Grazing – April 2010

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Orchard floor management effects on nitrogen fertility and soil biological activity in newly established organic apple orchard.

L. Hoagland, L. Carpenter-Boggs, D. Granatstein, M. Mazzola, J. Smith, F. Peryea, and J. Reganold. 2008. Biology and Fertility of Soils online.

Role of native soil biology in Brassicaceous seed meal-induced weed suppression.

L. Hoagland, L. Carpenter-Boggs, J.P. Reganold, M. Mazzola. 2008. Soil Biology Biochemistry 40:1689-1697.

Comparing tillage and mulching for organic orchard performance

Wiman, M., Kirby, E., Granatstein, D., Mullinix, K. 2008. Poster presented at 2008 BIOAg Research Symposium.

Material Registration for Organic Production – Winter 2008

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Mulching options for Northwest organic and conventional orchards

Granatstein, D. and K. Mullinix. 2008. HortScience 43(1):45-50.

Effects of Ground Cover Management Strategies on Yield and Nitrogen Supply in Organic Apple Production Systems

Poster presentation – BIOAg Research Symposium 2008.

Organic Transition Systems for Weed Management in Eastern Washington

Randall Stevens, Amanda Snyder, Washington State University, Pullman; Robert Gallagher, Pennsylvania State University, University Park; Dennis Pittmann, Kate Painter, Ian C. Burke, E. Patrick Fuerst, and Richard Koenig, Washington State University, Pullman. 2008.

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