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Nutrient Recovery

 

Historically, animal manures rich in nutrients were amended to nearby agricultural lands to maintain soil health. However, when manures are applied in excess of crop nutrient demands, elevated levels  of phosphorus, nitrogen, salts, and potentially pathogens, may contribute to air and water quality degradation.  Increased attention is being paid to the development of commercially viable nutrient recovery technologies that may reduce environmental loading, and decrease the rising cost of dairy manure nutrient management. Emerging nitrogen and phosphorus recovery technologies have the potential to partition nutrients in forms that are more easily transported off-dairy to croplands that are in need of nutrients, with benefits for dairies, crop farms, and the environment.

Nutrient recovery work at CSANR includes research and extension efforts aimed both at dairies, and at crop farms and others who are potential users of dairy-derived nutrients.

Featured Publications

Protocol for Third Party Evaluation of Agricultural Nutrient Management Technologies

Bronstad, E., G. Yorgey, and M. Stoermann. 2018. Washington State University and Newtrient.

Nutrient Recovery: Products from dairy manure to improve soil fertility

Benedict, C., J. Harrison, S. Hall, G. Yorgey. 2018. Washington State University. FS305E.

Approaches to Nutrient Recovery from Dairy Manure

Frear, C., J. Ma, G. Yorgey. 2018. WSU Fact Sheet EM112E. This fact sheet is part of the AD Systems Series.

Evaluation of Low-Impact Ammonia Stripping with Bio-Fertilizer Recovery and Support for Technology Decision Making

Ewing, T., G. Yorgey, C. Frear, and L. Yu. 2018. The Water Research Foundation.

Video: Recovering Nutrients from Manure – New Tools for Maintaining Air and Water Quality

Hall, S., and G.G. Yorgey. 2017.  Produced by CAHNRS Communications. Washington State University, Pullman, WA.  This video profiles two Washington State dairies – Edaleen Dairy and Royal Dairy – who have implemented new technologies that partition, and in some cases recover, some of the nitrogen and phosphorus in manure. The video discusses both the potential that these new tools have to improve manure management for dairies, and some of the challenges that remain.

Soil Amendments

Yorgey, G., W. Pan, R. Awale, S. Machado, A. Bary. 2017. Chapter 7 In Yorgey, G. and C. Kruger, eds. Advances in Dryland Production Systems in the Pacific Northwest. Washington State University Extension, Pullman, WA.

Profits from pollutants: Economic feasibility of integrated anaerobic digester and nutrient management systems

Astill, G.M. and C.R. Shumway.  Journal of Environmental Management. 2016. In Press.

Phosphorus Uptake by Potato from Fertilizers Recovered from Anaerobic Digestion

Collins, H. P., E. Kimura, C. S. Frear, and C. E. Kruger. 2016. Agron. J. 108:2036-2049. doi:10.2134/agronj2015.0302

Economic Feasibility of Anaerobic Digester Systems with Nutrient Recovery Technologies

Galinato, S. P., C. E. Kruger, and C. Frear. Sept. 2016. WSU Fact Sheet TB27E. This publication analyzes the economic feasibility of three nutrient recovery technologies that work in tandem with anaerobic digester systems. This fact sheet is part of the AD Systems Series.

The Rationale for Recovery of Phosphorus and Nitrogen from Dairy Manure

Yorgey, G., C. Frear, C. Kruger, T. Zimmerman. 2014. WSU Extension Fact Sheet FS136E. This fact sheet is part of the AD Systems Series.


Additional Publications

Review of emerging nutrient recovery technologies for farm-based anaerobic digesters and other renewable energy systems

Prepared for Innovation Center for US Dairy by Jingwei Ma, Nick Kennedy, Georgine Yorgey and Craig Frear.  Nov 2013.  Washington State University.

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