Rangelands Publications

13 Publications

Those Nasty Weeds – Why Not Control Naturally with Livestock

Managed grazing update provided by Extension Educator Steve Van Vleet. Sept 2011.

Controlling Leafy Spurge by Goat Grazing – April 2010

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Beefing Up the Palouse

Since 1985 the U.S. government has implemented the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) which pays farmers NOT to grow crops on millions of acres of highly erodable land. In addition to being a controversial program, much of this land is now coming out of CRP which puts pressure on farmers to grow crops in these areas once again. In the Palouse in Washington State, local farmers and ranchers are looking at holistically grazing livestock as an economically and environmentally sustainable alternative to traditional wheat farming in these sensitive areas and to the CRP in general. Video presented by Managing Change Northwest.

Surprising New Uses for Former CRP Land

2010. By Kathy Barnard in Connections Magazine (CAHNRS and WSU Extension Alumni and Friends publication).

2008 Estimated Costs and Returns for a 150-head Cow-calf to Grass-finished Beef Production System in the Channelled Scablands Range Area of East-central Washington

In response to the popularity of grass-finished beef, this publication provides a production budget analysis using both ranch-owned and leased forage sources in eastern Washington to determine profitability. Funded by the William D. Ruckelshaus Center, the Beefing Up the Palouse pilot project applied a total systems approach to develop a replicable production model to help producers take full advantage of the eastern Washington dryland wheat production area resource base.

Land EKG: Ecosystem Service Monitoring for Range Managers

Poster presentation – BIOAg Research Symposium 2008.

Implementing Noxious Weed Control through Multispecies Grazing

Don Nelson, WSU, led a 3-year SARE funded project looking at using sequences of different grazing animals to control noxious weeds, especially useful for non-cropland where other options are not feasible.

Liability & Public Use of Your Land – December 2004

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Vegetation Management the Natural Way with Goats and Sheep – September 2004

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Thundering Hooves Farm: Land in Stewardship – March 2004

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Healing the Land through Multi-Species Grazing

A noxious weed invasion is underway on the rangelands of the western United States that is causing significant problems in the form of ecosystem and bio-diversity damage resulting in a reduction in the carrying capacity of grazing animals. The expenditure of millions of dollars on control measures has not been successful; these measures have had negative impacts on livestock producers’ profitability and, in some cases, have caused environmental problems. This DVD is about the use of multi-species grazing (cattle, sheep, goats) as a tool in an integrated approach to the control of noxious weeds. It depicts the activities of a 2-year regional project funded by the USDA Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Professional Development program. Thirty participants from four states (Washington, Idaho, Oregon, and California) took part in this project. They represented state/federal agencies, extension, county weed boards and ranchers. Three of these projects are described in this DVD. 37 minutes. (available for purchase or free online viewing)

Organic Livestock: Principles, Practices, and Prospects

Videostream of October 29, 2004 WSU Satellite broadcast.

2003 Graziers Conference: Grazing According to Gerrish – December 2003

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter