Cogger Publications

13 Publications

Management to Reduce N2O Emissions in Organic Vegetable Production Systems

Cogger, C., A. Fortuna, D. Collins. Feb 27, 2014. The second of a two-part webinar series on Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Quality in Long-term Integrated and Transitional Reduced Tillage Organic Systems.

This is the focus of our current research. How do different organic vegetable production systems affect N2O emissions, and how do other outcomes of those systems affect their potential for adoption?

  • Systems include full tillage with high-carbon amendment (compost), full tillage with low carbon amendment (broiler litter), pasture-vegetable rotation, and reduced tillage cover crop mulch.
  • Measurements include N2O and CO2 emissions, soil N, microbial ecology focused on denitrification organisms, crop yield, and soil quality. Measurements are focused on key times during the season, including amendment application and tillage, irrigation, and freeze-thaw.

Intended audience is other researchers, and interested extension faculty and farmers.

Why the Concern about Nitrous Oxide Emissions?

Cogger, C., A. Fortuna, D. Collins. Feb 25, 2014. The first of a two-part webinar series on Greenhouse Gas Emissions and Soil Quality in Long-term Integrated and Transitional Reduced Tillage Organic Systems.

Topics for this webinar include:

  • Source and properties of N2O as a greenhouse gas, its relative contribution to global
  • warming, and the role of agriculture in N2O emissions
  • Review of the nitrogen cycle and the production of N2O
  • The relationship between organic practices and N2O production
  • How we measure N2O emissions

Intended audience is extension faculty and farmers who want a big picture perspective on why we’re interested in nitrous oxide emissions.

Soil Fertility in Organic Systems: A Guide for Gardeners and Small Acreage Farmers

Collins,D. C. Miles, C. Cogger, R. Koenig. 2013.  Pacific Northwest Extension Publication PNW646.

Climate Change: what does the science really tell us?

A narrated Extension PowerPoint on climate science and climate change. The presentation was prepared by Craig Cogger at WSU Puyallup and covers the basics of climate science, evidence of climate change, projections of future climate change, and mitigation strategies. The presentation consists of 10 parts, each about five minutes long, so that it can be viewed in short sittings.

Struvite as a Phosphorus Fertilizer Source for Greenhouse Crop Production – webinar

This webinar highlights recent research by Rita Hummel of WSU on struvite as a phosphorus source for greenhouse production of bedding plants and vegetable starts. Her research includes struvite derived from municipal wastewater and dairy manure. Craig Cogger opened the webinar with a brief overview of the phosphorus challenge. After Rita’s presentation of greenhouse research results, Keith Bowers discussed struvite production as one phosphorus removal technology for wastewater at livestock, food processing, and public sewage treatment sites. The webinar closed with a brief summary by Craig and an open question period.

Climate Change webinars (parts 1 & 2)

We hear about climate change from the media, but the information can be confusing and politically charged. WSU soil scientist Craig Cogger presented a two-part webinar series to cut through the confusion and understand the science of climate change. View Part 1, What does the science really tell us about past and current climate trends? HERE. View Part 2, Climate models, skepticism, and our response to climate disruption HERE.

Closing the recycling loop through organic amendments in agriculture and gardens

Recorded webinar (online presentation) from Jan 2011 by Craig Cogger, Crop and Soils Scientist and Extension Educator. This seminar discusses research and guidelines on soil amendment choices based on use, nitrogen availability, carbon sequestration potential, handling nutrient imbalances in organic amendments, and an update on herbicide issues in some composts.

Creating High Value Potting Media from Composts Made with Biosolids and Carbon-Rich Organic Wastes

Organic Waste to Resources Research and Pilot Project Report. Hummel, R., C. Cogger, A. Bary, and B. Riley, May 2010. Ecology Publication Number 09-07-069. Composted organic waste including biosolids may substitute for potting soil for nursery uses. This study found that composted organic materials can perform as well as typical peat-perlite potting mixtures.

Land Application – A true path to zero waste?

Organic Waste to Resources Research and Pilot Project Report. Brown, S., K. Kurtz, C. Cogger and A. Bary, March 2010. Ecology Publication Number 09-07-059. This study tested the benefits of compost and biosolids applications to soils. Benefits included increased C and N levels, improved soil bulk density, water holding capacity and crop yield.

Backyard Composting

Cogger, C. and D. Sullivan. WSU Extension Bulletin EB1784E. Rev. March, 2009. This updated bulletin provides a straight forward guide to making and using compost with an introductory section on the science of composting.

Washington State Compost Educator’s Guide

Wescott, H., A. Bary, C. Cogger, C. Sullivan. 2009. This guide provides science-based information on residential composting and vermicomposting for use in Washington and assists compost educators with training events and outreach. Project was supported by the Washington State Department of Ecology and US EPA-Region 10.

Estimating Plant-Available Nitrogen Release from Manures, Composts, and Specialty Products

Gale, E., D. Sullivan, C. Cogger, A. Bary, D. Hemphill and E. Myhre. 2006. J. Environ. Qual. 35:2321-2332.

Potential compost benefits for restoration of soils disturbed by urban development

Cogger, C. 2005. Compost Sci. Utiliz. 13:243-251.