Painter Publications

24 Publications

Precision Nitrogen Application: Eric Odberg Case Study

Yorgey, G., S. Kantor, K. Painter, H. Davis, and L. Bernacchi. 2014. Video and text farmer case study. Eric Odberg is a fourth generation farmer who practices no-till management and was an early adopter of variable rate nitrogen (VRN) application in the dryland production region of the Pacific Northwest.

Increasing resilience among cereal-based farmers in the Inland Pacific Northwest – Farmer to Farmer Case Studies

Yorgey, Georgine, Kathleen Painter, Hilary Davis, Kristy Borrelli, Sylvia Kantor, Leigh Bernacchi, R. Dennis Roe, Chad Kruger  2014.  Video and print case studies part of REACCH PNA project. The goal of these case studies to inspire others to take management risks on their farms that can improve their overall sustainability and resiliency into the future. Future case studies are in progress and will focus on farmers who manage water in irrigated systems, tillage practices and residue management in unique ways.

Site-Specific Trade-offs of Harvesting Cereal Residues as Biofuel Feedstocks in Dryland Annual Cropping Systems of the Pacific Northwest, USA

Huggins, D.R., C.E. Kruger, K.M. Painter, D.P. Uberuaga. BioEnergy Research. June 2014, Volume 7, Issue 2, pp 598-608.

Life cycle assessment of the potential carbon credit from no- and reduced-tillage winter wheat-based cropping systems in Eastern Washington State

Zaher, U, C. Stockle, K. Painter, S. Higgins. Agricultural Systems. November 2013. Volume 122, pages 73-78.

Integrating Livestock into Dryland Organic Crop Rotations

Carpenter-Boggs, L., Painter, K., and Wachter, J. Recorded webinar presentation delivered October 22, 2013.  It covers a variety of reasons to integrate livestock into crop rotations, and summarizes past research on the topic. It is directed towards beginning growers interested in diversifying their income and crop rotations, towards educators and Extension workers, and towards a more general audience wanting to learn more about mixed crop-livestock systems.

Biofuel Economics and Policy for Washington State

This report is a comprehensive response to 2007 Washington State legislation (HB 1303) that tasked Washington State University to 1) analyze the types and corresponding amounts of biofuel in the state and 2) recommend viable incentive programs to promote biofuel market development. Inside you will find policy recommendations based on analysis of a broad set of policy options, including renewable fuel standards and subsidies, carbon taxes, as well as approaches to support research, implementation of new technologies, and creation of infrastructure.

Life Cycle Assessment of the Potential Carbon Credit from No- and Reduced- Tillage Winter Wheat in the U.S. Northwest

Chapter 25 in Climate Friendly Farming: Improving the Carbon Footprint of Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. Full report available at http://csanr.wsu.edu/pages/Climate_Friendly_Farming_Final_Report/.

An Economic Analysis of the Potential for Carbon Credits to Improve Profitability of Conservation Tillage Systems Across Washington State

Chapter 24 in Climate Friendly Farming: Improving the Carbon Footprint of Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. Full report available at http://csanr.wsu.edu/pages/Climate_Friendly_Farming_Final_Report/.

Economic Enterprise Budgets for Conservation Tillage Systems in Washington State.

Appendix A: Lind Conventional and Reduced Tillage

Appendix B: St. John Conventional Tillage

Appendix C: St. John No Tillage

Appendix D: Pullman Conventional Tillage

Appendix E: Pullman Reduced Tillage

Appendix F: Pullman No Tillage

Appendix G: Irrigated Conventional Tillage

Appendix H: Irrigated Reduced Tillage

CropSyst Simulation of the Effect of Tillage and Rotation on the Potential for Carbon Sequestration and on Nitrous Oxide Emissions in Eastern Washington

Chapter 23 in Climate Friendly Farming: Improving the Carbon Footprint of Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. Full report available at http://csanr.wsu.edu/pages/Climate_Friendly_Farming_Final_Report/.

Bioenergy as an Agricultural GHG Mitigation Strategy in Washington State

Chapter 22 in Climate Friendly Farming: Improving the Carbon Footprint of Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest. Full report available at http://csanr.wsu.edu/pages/Climate_Friendly_Farming_Final_Report/.

Climate Friendly Farming Final Report: Improving the Carbon Footprint of Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest

The WSU Center for Sustaining Agriculture & Natural Resources established the Climate Friendly Farming Project in 2003 with an initial grant from the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation. This report represents the culmination of research and assessment of the potential for improved management and technology deployment to reduce agricultural greenhouse gas emissions in the Pacific Northwest.

Potential for a Sugar Beet Ethanol Industry in Washington State

A Report to the Washington State Department of Agriculture. School of Economic Sciences. WSU. March 2009

Organic Alfalfa Management Guide

This new extension bulletin is an excellent resource for growers interested in producing organic alfalfa, both irrigated and dryland. Alfalfa provides an excellent transitional crop for those interested in organic production of other crops as well. This guide includes a great deal of information on managing weeds, pests and diseases, and includes a small section on economics.

Crop Yield and Revenue Variability Across Time and Space at the Cook Agronomy Farm, 2001-2006

D. Huggins and K. Painter. Abstract in 2008 Dryland Field Day Abstracts: Highlights of Research Progress.

A Rising Price Tide has Raised All Commodities, but Winter Canola Still Nets Less than Soft White Winter Wheat in the Irrigated Columbia Basin.

2008 Dryland Field Day Abstracts: Highlights of Research Progress, pp. 20-21. Crop & Soil Sciences, WSU.

Profitable Strategies for Transitioning to Organic Grain Production in the Arid West

A large-scale field project on transitioning to organic grain (primarily wheat) production in the Palouse region (dryland, annual cropping) was started in 2002. Three years of transition and two years of wheat production have been monitored, with nine different cropping systems. Weed control and fertility have been big challenges. An economic analysis indicates that using alfalfa during the three-year transition could be the most profitable strategy. Investigators include Dr. Ian Burke, Dr. Rich Koenig, Dr. Pat Fuerst, Dr. Rob Gallagher, Dennis Pittman, and Dr. Kathleen Painter.

Organic and Beyond: Consumer Demand Growing for Differentiated Farm Products – Spring 2008

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Economic Analysis for Transitioning to Organic Grain (poster)

May 2008

Organic Transition Systems for Weed Management in Eastern Washington

Randall Stevens, Amanda Snyder, Washington State University, Pullman; Robert Gallagher, Pennsylvania State University, University Park; Dennis Pittmann, Kate Painter, Ian C. Burke, E. Patrick Fuerst, and Richard Koenig, Washington State University, Pullman. 2008.

Assessing the Economic Impact of Energy Price Increases on Washington Agriculture and the Washington Economy: A General Equilibrium Approach.

Working Paper 2007-14, School of Economic Sciences, Washington State University, 2007.

Research Brief: Market and Opportunities for Organic Feed Production in Eastern Washington – April 2007

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Economics of Dryland Winter Canola Production in Eastern Washington and Oregon

Painter, Kathleen. 2006 Field Day Proceedings: Highlights of Research Progress featuring Climate Friendly Farming. Tech. Report 06-2. Dept. Crop and Soil Sciences, Wash. State U., Pullman, June 2006, pp.14.

Economics of Spring Canola Production in Dryland Eastern Washington

WSU Extension Bulletin EB2009E. Includes Excel budgets. Kathleen Painter, Dennis Roe, and Herbert Hinman.

Cost Savings from Reduced Tillage in a Potato/Corn/Corn Rotation under Center Pivot Irrigation, Columbia Basin

Poster presentation from 2006 Paterson Field Day.