Natural Resources Publications

38 Publications

Family Forest Owners and Climate Change: Understanding, Attitudes, and Educational Needs

Grotta, A.T., J.H. Creighton, C. Schnepf, and S. Kantor. 2013. J. For. 111(2): 87–93.

BioEarth: A regional-scale earth system model to inform land and water management decisions

Adam, J.C., Rajagopalan, K., Stockle, C.O., Kruger, C.E., Brady, M.P., Barber, M.E., Chinnayakanahalli, K.J., Yorgey, G.G., Nelson, R.L., Dinesh, S., Malek, K., Yoder, J., Chung, S., Vaughan, J.K., Leung, F., Lamb, B.K., Evans, R.D., Harrison, J., Stephens, J., Guenther, A., Kalyanaraman, A., Leung, L.R., Liu, M., Tague, C., Perleberg, A.B., Chen, Y., Norton, T.M., Jiang, X., & Zhu, J. (2012). BioEarth: A regional-scale earth system model to inform land and water management decisions. ASA-CSSA-SSSA International Annual Meeting, Cincinnati, OH.22 October 2012.  The poster can be downloaded via link.

2011 Columbia River Basin Long Term Water Supply and Demand Forecast Technical Report

2012. Ecology Publication 12-12-001.  The technical report is available for download by section, including appendices, at the bottom of the linked page.

2011 Columbia River Basin Long Term Water Supply and Demand Forecast Legislative Report

2012. Ecology Publication 11-12-011.

Assessing the Impact of Climate Change on Columbia River Basin Agriculture through Integrated Crop Systems, Hydrologic, and Water Management Modeling

Rajagopalan, K., K. Chinnayakanahalli, J.C. Adam, C.S. Stockle, R. Nelson, M. Brady, M.E. Barber, S. Dinesh, K. Malek, G. Yorgey, C. Kruger, T. Marsh, and J. Yoder, 2011.  AGU Fall Meeting Abstracts, San Francisco, CA, Dec. 6.

Climate Change and Family Forest Landowners in Idaho

Schnepf, C., J. Creighton, A. Grotta, S. Kantor. 2011. Executive summary available here.

Climate Change and Family Forest Landowners in Washington

Creighton, J., C. Schnepf, A. Grotta, S. Kantor. 2011.

Climate Change and Family Forest Landowners in Oregon

Grotta, A., J. Creighton, C. Schnepf, S. Kantor. 2011.

Executive Summary – Climate Change and Family Forest Landowners in Idaho

Schnepf, C., J. Creighton, A. Grotta, S. Kantor. 2011. Full report available here.

Climate Change and Family Forest Landowners in Alaska

Kantor, S., J. Creighton, C. Schnepf, A. Grotta. 2011.

How family forest landowners in the Pacific Northwest perceive climate change

Private forest landowners in the Pacific Northwest and elsewhere face the same challenges as public land managers with regard to changing forest conditions. However, little is known regarding the understanding family forest landowners have about climate change and the potential impacts on how they manage their forests. Consequently, the degree to which private landowners are prepared to respond effectively is unknown. To make sure new research and extension programming related to climate change and western forests is as useful as possible for family forest owners, researchers at three universities conducted a needs assessment in Alaska, Idaho, Oregon and Washington to determine family forest owners’ perceptions, understanding, and educational needs regarding the impact of climate change on their forests. The Oregon, Washington, Alaska and Idaho reports are linked here, as well as an executive summary of the Idaho report.

Those Nasty Weeds – Why Not Control Naturally with Livestock

Managed grazing update provided by Extension Educator Steve Van Vleet. Sept 2011.

WRDC Rural Connections Newsletter: Climate Change issue

Western Rural Development Center’s Rural Connections Newsletter Climate Change issue June 2011 contains three articles written by CSANR faculty and staff members. View the entire issue here (6 MB), or view the individual articles by clicking the titles here: Anaerobic Digestion in the Pacific Northwest; Climate Change and Family Forest Landowners in the Pacific Northwest: Attitudes & Understanding; Climate Change and Agriculture in the Pacific Northwest.

Microbiology of Water: Irrigation to Ingredient

A powerpoint created by Dr. K. Killinger, WSU.

Controlling Leafy Spurge by Goat Grazing – April 2010

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Beefing Up the Palouse

Since 1985 the U.S. government has implemented the Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) which pays farmers NOT to grow crops on millions of acres of highly erodable land. In addition to being a controversial program, much of this land is now coming out of CRP which puts pressure on farmers to grow crops in these areas once again. In the Palouse in Washington State, local farmers and ranchers are looking at holistically grazing livestock as an economically and environmentally sustainable alternative to traditional wheat farming in these sensitive areas and to the CRP in general. Video presented by Managing Change Northwest.

Surprising New Uses for Former CRP Land

2010. By Kathy Barnard in Connections Magazine (CAHNRS and WSU Extension Alumni and Friends publication).

Organic Alfalfa Management Guide

This new extension bulletin is an excellent resource for growers interested in producing organic alfalfa, both irrigated and dryland. Alfalfa provides an excellent transitional crop for those interested in organic production of other crops as well. This guide includes a great deal of information on managing weeds, pests and diseases, and includes a small section on economics.

Micro Plastic Pollution in Puget Sound and Northwest Straits – August 2009

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

2008 Estimated Costs and Returns for a 150-head Cow-calf to Grass-finished Beef Production System in the Channelled Scablands Range Area of East-central Washington

In response to the popularity of grass-finished beef, this publication provides a production budget analysis using both ranch-owned and leased forage sources in eastern Washington to determine profitability. Funded by the William D. Ruckelshaus Center, the Beefing Up the Palouse pilot project applied a total systems approach to develop a replicable production model to help producers take full advantage of the eastern Washington dryland wheat production area resource base.

Implementing Noxious Weed Control through Multispecies Grazing

Don Nelson, WSU, led a 3-year SARE funded project looking at using sequences of different grazing animals to control noxious weeds, especially useful for non-cropland where other options are not feasible.

Forest Certification in North America – March 2006

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Anaerobic Digesters and Water Quality: Helping Hood Canal – September 2005

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Livelihood Strategies of Mushroom Pickers and Buyers in Western Montana: An Exploratory Case Study – September 2005

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

Water Quality Education Workshop a Grand Success – June 2005

Article in Sustaining the Pacific Northwest Newsletter

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